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Flight MH370 underwater search continues

The search for the Malaysia Airlines missing flight MH370 that has headed underwater has reached a very critical juncture announced the Malaysian government asking for prayers of it being successfully completed. They feel the search could finally be completed this week. The current underwater search is focused on a tight 10 kilometre circle on the floor of the Indian Ocean reported the Australian search officials. A United States Navy’s deep sea autonomous underwater vehicle has been deployed for a remote stretch of the Indian Ocean floor for signs of the wreckage of the missing MH370 on March 8 with 239 people on board. The Bluefin-21 is the autonomous underwater vehicle that has been used for surveying. It uses sonar for the search and can also employ cameras to probe further when something is detected. After searching for almost two months without having been able to locate any debris, the underwater search began about a small area consolidated on the location of the pings taken to have been emitted from the plane’s black box recorders on April 8. The Joint Agency Coordination Centre conducting the search stated that if the weather conditions were favorable the search would be completed within this week.They however added that completion did not entail that the search had yielded results. Around 24 countries have been involved in the hunt for the Boeing 777 which disappeared from radar an hour into its flight from Kuala Lumpur. The search for flight MH370 has been on for weeks as daily sorties by planes and ships have failed to turn up any trace of the plane. This mysterious disappearance of the aircraft has baffled aviation experts across the world while having become the most expensive search operation in aviation history. The Bluefin-21 dived as deep as 4,695 metres, a record for the machine that has been deployed six times spanning 133 square kilometres while footage received from it is being...

Underwater search for Flight MH370 commences

A fifth signal from the black box of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 had been heard in the same area where search had been going on for possibly locating it. An RAAF AP-3C Orion aircraft detected a signal in the same vicinity as of the Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield exclaimed the head of the search team. However the signal needed investigation. Finding the black box is crucial for knowing what happened on March 8 when the Beijing-bound Boeing 777-200 with 239 people, including five Indians, disappeared after taking off from Kuala Lumpur. The batteries powering the black box work only for 30 days after a crash. They are stored in a plane’s tail designed to begin sending off distinctive and high-pitched pings on coming in contact with water. Earlier The Ocean Shield’s towed pinger locator had picked up two signals. Based on the pings the Australian Maritime Safety Authority had narrowed down the search area to about 57,923 sq km lying approximately 2,280 km northwest of Perth. These pings from the black box of the ill fated flight MH370 will seemingly lead to the finding of the wreckage of the aircraft. The searchers are very confident that the series of underwater signals detected in the remote part of the Indian Ocean were from the flight MH370’s black box. It has been decided to deploy the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle or an unmanned submarine on advice from experts on board the Ocean Shield to find the wreckage and locate the black box of Flight MH370 at the bottom of the Indian Ocean its final resting place. The Bluefin-21, a probe equipped with side-scan sonar will set out to scour the ocean floor. It will take two hours for the Bluefin-21 to get down to the bottom of the ocean where it will work for 16 hours before resurfacing in another two hours. Then another four hours will go into downloading and analyzing the collected data. Australian defence vessel Ocean Shield has also detected an oil slick and has collected samples for...

Call from co-pilot of Flight MH370 on March 8

It has been reported that co-pilot Fariq Abdul Hamid of Flight MH370 had made a desperate call mid-air from his mobile phone moments before the jet went off the radar with 239 people on board under mysterious circumstances on March 8. The call from co-pilot however ended abruptly only after having established contact with a tower near Penang Island on Malaysia’s west coast. The entire incident revealed that it was definitely crucial as it was just before the Malaysian Airlines plane had lost contact the morning of March 8 when the plane was heading towards its destination Bejing. It has been presumed that the call had been cut off likely because the plane was positioned away from the tower that had established the call and yet to come under the coverage of the next one as the plane was moving. Investigators are trying to investigate this piece of evidence to find out as to discovery what had exactly happened moments before the Boeing 777 Flight MH370 went off the radar some 200 nautical miles northwest of Penang. Fariq’s last communication had been reported to have taken place at 11.30pm local time on March 7 before he boarded the jet for his six-hour scheduled flight from Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia. It has also been found that Fariq’s phone had been switched off before the plane took off to be switched on only moments before the plane went missing. The mystery of the missing flight MH370 continues to perplex aviation and security authorities who have so far not been able to pinpoint the wreckage despite utilizing hi-tech gadgets in the search operation for the last 37...

Chinese ship senses pinger in Indian Ocean

In a heart rendering development a Chinese ship searching for locating the black box of the missing flight MH370 picked up a pulse signal or pinger from the Indian Ocean. A very limited time window is available until April 8, 2014 for all the search ships towing pinger locators to trace the emissions from the black box of the Malaysian Airlines aircraft that disappeared on March 8, as the batteries of the flight data recorder runs out in a month. Haixun 01 perceived a pulse signal with a frequency of 37.5kHz per second in southern Indian Ocean waters yesterday on April 5, 2014. It is yet to be established whether the pinger is related to the Boeing 777-200 that is believed to have crashed with 239 people on board. A black box detector set up by the Haixun 01 picked up the signal at around 25 degrees south latitude and 101 degrees east longitude. Almost 10 military planes, three civilian jets and 11 ships are scouring an area of about 217,000 sq km, 1,700 km north-west of Perth that could unravel the mystery that has shrouded flight MH370 till date. The frequency of 37.5 kHz per second is currently the international standard for the underwater locator beacon on a plane’s black box. A Chinese air force plane searching for the jet has spotted a number of white floating objects in the area being searched which were photographed and the sightings reported to the Joint Agency Coordination Center that is managing this huge multinational search in the southern Indian Ocean. Acting Malaysian Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein has assured all in Kuala Lumpur that the cost of the ongoing search will not be a deterrent as the solace of the kin and relatives of the people lost on board the ill-fated plane is...

Pinger locator for Flight MH370 search

The hunt for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 on Friday, April 04, 2014 utilized a sophisticated towed pinger locator to find the black box of the Boeing 777. With April 8 just a few days away it will almost a month since the Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 was lost on March 8. Since the batteries of the Flight Data Recorder or Black Box remain active by sending out an ultrasonic ping for only about a month after a crash the pinger locater was set out being towed by two ships involved in the search for the debris and wreckage of the supposedly crashed aircraft killing all 239 on board. An area of 240 km that has been marked out as to the most probable zone of the crash, has the ships carrying the pinger locator that is equipped to trace the ping of the black boxes with its sensitive hearing equipment. The marked out zone is a very remote and inaccessible pocket lying in the Southern Indian Ocean with roaring seas and bad weather making the search for debris and wreckage of MH370 a very tedious process. The cost that is being incurred by the various nations of the world is also sky-high as the zone is thousands of kilometers into the seas away from any land. This is the last ditch effort to retrieve the black box and cockpit voice recorder of the missing flight MH370. The search is based from Perth in Western Australia involving fourteen aircraft and 11 ships none of whom have actually found any debris of the crashed plane as of yet. Angus Houston heading the Joint Agencies Coordination Centre that is leading the search stated the above facts at the initiation of the sub-surface search for black box pings. The Australian Navy’s vessel Ocean Shield was using a towed pinger locator from the US Navy along with the vessel HMS Echo are trying to locate the critical information loaded Flight Data Recorder and Cockpit Voice Recorder. Ultrasonic pings at 37.5kHz are emitted by the underwater location beacon pinger of the flight data recorder but the batteries run out after a month of emitting...

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